Aparicio leading students to success

By Marleld Duran

Staff writer

“[I wanted to be the Associated Student Body (ASB) advisor] because I wanted to bridge the gap [for] students with special needs [who don’t have] opportunities to be leaders,” said Yvonne Aparicio, who has been a special education teacher for five years. “There needed to be more [variety] of students included in ASB.”

Aparicio is currently advising her fourth year of ASB and has learned that being the advisor means organizing and overseeing all of the events the class is responsible for. Events such as Prom take nearly a year to plan.

Yet, according to the class, having administrative support helps them strive forward. It is easier for events to be carried out when the administration is on board with the plan.

Event planning begins with brainstorming ideas that will fit for all class levels and reflecting on the pros and cons from previous years.

Despite planning over the summer, Homecoming tends to be the most hectic part throughout the year. The rally, football halftime production, and dance all happen within the same month. There is never a time where there is not an event going on.

“As ASB members, a lot of responsibility falls [on] us. [She] is like [our] mom who keeps everyone on task,” stated freshman vice president, Amanda Brunjes. “She is always there supporting us […]as well as giving us insightful advice.”

Aparicio helps her students execute the occasion until the very end, supporting them throughout. Although she may not be seen during the events, she tends to be in the shadows pulling the strings and making sure everything goes smoothly.

“It’s never perfect, [but] we’re always making improvements,” she said reassuringly.

Aparicio admitted that the most challenging part about advising ASB is the events and their interference with teachers’ schedules. It can be hard for students to prepare for a lunctime rally or barbeque because they are still in class. Fortunately, many teachers are understanding and allow the students to leave class a few minutes early.

What makes the work worth it for Aparicio is “seeing the kids plan something, take it on, and follow it through,” she shared. “It’s nice to say ‘good job.’”

Aparicio also gives credit to the students. She mentioned that the ASB students do a lot of small things that go unnoticed. They make sure there are snacks for students during lunch.

“Without her, it wouldn’t be the same wonderful leadership class it is,” Brunjes said with a smile.

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